2011-12 Ed. 10

2011 HUNTSMAN WORLD  SENIOR GAMES – RESULTS

 Congratulations to all the medalists in the 2011 Huntsman World Senior Games held in St.
George, Utah, October 15-16!  Thanks to Linda Downey for the great photo of the players,
as well as the photos of Dan Bulkley and Judy Gray elsewhere in this newsletter.  Results
are listed below:

 

LADIES’ SINGLES 50-54

Gold: Barbara Heaney; Silver: Julia Watterson; Bronze: Nancy Manweiler

LADIES’ SINGLES 55-59

Gold: Ann Choi; Silver: Corazon Cuyegkeng; Bronze: Amanda Ritchie

LADIES’ SINGLES 60-64

Gold: Karen Jerg; Silver: Pat Stinson; Bronze: Monika Leung

LADIES’ SINGLES 65-69

Gold: Mary Blandino; Silver: Alice Tym; Bronze: Sanne Dryborough

LADIES’ SINGLES 70-74

Gold: Judy Gray; Silver: Margot Hurst; Bronze: Jane Amiotte

LADIES’ SINGLES 75-79

Gold: Peggy Jefferson

LADIES SINGLES 80-84

Gold: Joyce Jones

 

MEN’S SINGLES 50-54

Gold: Alexandre Latchininsky; Silver: Chris Frei; Bronze: Jim Swaydan

MEN’S SINGLES 55-59

Gold: David Goldshaw; Silver: Stephen Frei; Bronze: Dennis Ritchie

MEN’S SINGLES 60-64

Gold: Henry Paynter; Silver: John Paul Jones; Bronze: Wayne Fullerton

MEN’S SINGLES 65-69

Gold: Grant Taggard; Silver: Stanley Boyd; Bronze: Murray Foubister

MEN’S SINGLES 70-74

Gold: Peter Eltgroth; Silver: Jim Greenlees; Bronze: Norman Carruthers

MEN’S SINGLES 90-94

Gold: Daniel Buckley

 

LADIES’ DOUBLES 50-54

Gold: Ann Choi/Julia Watterson

LADIES’ DOUBLES 55-59

Gold: Monika Leung/Corazon Cuyegkeng; Silver: Susan Anderson/AmandaRitchie

LADIES’ DOUBLES 60-64

Gold: Anne Henderson/Pat Kirk; Silver: Mary Blandino/Karen Jerg; Bronze: Lesley Costello/Beverly Miller

LADIES’ DOUBLES 65-69

Gold: Judy Gray/Alice Tym; Silver: Lorna Hunter/Margot Hurst; Bronze: Sanne Dryborough/Joyce Jones

LADIES’ DOUBLES 70-74

Gold: Jeannine Bohn/Connie Lee; Silver: Doreen Elvedahl/Jessie Rogers; Bronze: Hazel Morgan/Dorris Taylor

LADIES’ DOUBLES 75-79

Gold: Peggy Jefferson/Georgia Keefer

 

MEN’S DOUBLES 50-54

Gold: Alexandre Latchininsky/David Goldshaw; Silver: Chris Frei/Stephen Frei; Bronze: Sanjoy Bhattacharya/Jim Swaydan

MEN’S DOUBLES 55-59

Gold: Dennis Ritchie/Mark Anderson

MEN’S DOUBLES 60-64

Gold: Leon Martin Cuyegkeng/Henry Paynter; Silver: Pit Hoong Yee/StephenWang; Bronze: David Flieger/John Paul Jones

MEN’S DOUBLES 65-69

Gold: Stanley Boyd/Jerrett Koenigsberg; Silver: Grant Taggard/Jim Stabler; Bronze: Terry Downey/Murray Foubister

MEN’S DOUBLES 70-74

Gold: Peter Eltgroth/Roberto Lee; Silver: Phil Brunner/Daniel Buckley

 

MIXED DOUBLES 50-54

Gold: Henry Paynter/Barbara Heaney; Silver: Alexandre Latchininsky/JuliaWatterson; Bronze: Jim Swaydan/Corazon Cuyegkeng

MIXED DOUBLES 55-59

Gold: David Goldshaw/Ann Choi; Silver: Stephen Frei/Patricia Ortlepp; Bronze: Mark Anderson/Susan Anderson

MIXED DOUBLES 60-64

Gold: Stephen Wang/Karen Jerg; Silver: John Paul Jones/Pat Stinson; Bronze: Terry Downey/Linda Downey

MIXED DOUBLES 65-69

Gold: Murray Foubister/Sanne Dryborough; Silver: Grant Taggard/HazelMorgan; Bronze: Marty Burns/Judy Gray

MIXED DOUBLES 70-74

Gold: Peter Eltgroth/Connie Lee; Silver: Roberto Lee/Sandra Matthieu; Bronze: Phil Brunner/Margot Hurst

MIXED DOUBLES 80-84

Gold: Daniel Buckley/Joyce Jones

 

BADMINTON PROFILES – DAN AND MARJORIE BULKLEY
By Alice Tym

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Dan and Marjorie Bulkley of Phoenix, Oregon, were attending the 2011 Huntsman Games in October where Dan won the 90+ Men’s Singles, Men’s Doubles, and Mixed 80-84. Dan began playing badminton at age 20 at Pomona College in Claremont, CA. He learned the sport in a physical education class and was inspired by Dave Freeman, “a phenomenon,” who won the Men’s singles, Doubles and Mixed in college and went on to win world titles before becoming a medical doctor.

 

Dan has won several USAB National Men’s Doubles titles with a variety of partners. He also won several medals at the Huntsman Games in track including a gold medal in the 800-meter run. Dan did the hurdles and sprints in college and became the track coach at Southern Oregon University. For twenty years, he was the only track coach at SOU coaching both the running and field events.

 

Dan is 94 years old! He also races in cross country skiing events where he holds numerous national titles and a world’s gold from Silver Star, CA. Dan attributes his prowess to “good genes,”, but Marjorie says he “trains all year!” Dan adds, “in moderation” and “never overdoes.” Marjorie compliments his athleticism. They met at a singles party (the first for each) and have been married for 28 years. She is a skier and a tennis player with the same zest for life as Dan.

 

Marjorie wanted me to be sure to include Dan’s interesting upbringing. His father was a missionary doctor in southern Thailand. Dan went to school at a hill station in southern India where he learned to play tennis. He said, “We walked everywhere, no cars.” He had six brothers and a sister.

 

Be sure to congratulate Dan on his achievements. He received a most deserved standing ovation in St. George, Utah.

 

BADMINTON PROFILES – JUDY GRAY

By Alice Tym

 

Arizona’s Judy Gray recently won the 70-74 Women’s Singles and Doubles in Houston at the NSGA Senior Nationals. Judy grew up in San Diego and learned to play badminton at the Federal Building’s ten indoor courts. She started as a senior in high school when she saw an entry blank and entered the C division and reached the finals in all events. After graduating from San Diego State, Judy married and kept playing badminton as an A player. She was ranked third in ladies’ doubles in 1966 and fourth in ladies’ singles. One of the highlights of Judy’s badminton was playing in the Mexican Nationals with Tai Sharrung and Pat Gallagher. She also enjoyed playing the World Masters in New Zealand in 2009 when her team beat Germany by a half point.

 

In 2005, Judy’s forester husband died. Dick and Karen Warnock encouraged her to come to OCBC and begin playing again. Now she is active in the senior tournaments including the Senior Games and the Huntsman Games. Judy’s future plans include playing the World Masters in Italy in August of 2013.

 

Endurance has been the key to Judy’s success. She was and still is a swimmer. She placed second in 1961 in the La Jolla Rough Water Swim. She continues to teach swimming as well as doing extensive quilting and stained glass work. Judy belongs to two quilting groups in Arizona and California, and has a special quadro sewing machine. She is active in the lives of her four grandkids, and is on the go with her many friends. We are so glad to have her as a member of the badminton community.

DO NOT STRESS OVER YOUR COMPETITIONBy Stan Popovich 

 

 

Many athletes sometimes get anxious when they play against a tough opponent. They get nervous over with whom they are competing,  and they get so worked up that they lose focus on playing their sport. In the end, they make mistakes and end up beating themselves up if they do not win. As a result, here is a list of techniques that an athlete can use to help manage the stress of playing against the competition.

The first step is to learn as much as you can about your opponent. Although this may seem obvious, some athletes may think they already know what they need to know. Remember there is always something to learn about your competition. Read the reports about your opponent and watch his or her performance. Try to figure out an angle on how you can beat your competition. The more you know about your competition the better your chances are you will win. This will also help reduce your worries in the future.

 

Do not assume anything about your competition whether they are stronger or weaker than you. Every athlete has his good and bad times and just because you may be facing a stronger opponent does not mean that you will lose. Remember that you and your opponent both have an equal chance of winning. You are both starting from scratch. This should help you to give you confidence going into your next event.
Focus on how you can best strive for perfection in your own event instead of worrying about your opponent. For instance, you are going against the number one athlete in the tournament and you are nervous. Instead of focusing on how good your competition is, focus on your performance. Concentrate on how you can perform your event and how you can best improve on your problem areas.
Realize that you can’t win all of the time and that also includes your competition. You may be the best athlete in the world, however you will still sometimes lose. No one can win all of the time.  When facing a tough competitor, use this fact to your advantage. Even the best athletes will make some mistakes.

 

It is not uncommon to get nervous when you go against a better opponent.  All you can do is to focus on your skill sets and do the best you can. This will help you in the long run.

 

BIOGRAPHY

Stan Popovich is the author of “A Layman’s Guide to Managing Fear Using Psychology, Christianity and Non Resistant Methods” – an easy to read book that presents a general overview of techniques that are effective in managing persistent fears and anxieties. For additional information go to: http://www.managingfear.com/

 

*******************************************************************

FEATHERS IN THE CORK #2

By Mary Ann Bowles

 

Below you’ll find four keys to the correct technique for hitting a shuttle:  

 

GRIP

The correct grip is essential for playing badminton. The panhandle grip will not give you the flexibility you need to make the correct shots. How do you hold the racket? The racket handle is laid across your fingers between the point where your fingers join your hand and the knuckles nearest your hand. The racket is held lightly so that you have a finger’s width between your racket handle and your hand. Gripping the racket as tight as you can freezes your racket and diminishes racket flexibility-it could also cause tennis elbow.

 

FOREARM ROTATION

Forearm rotation is the other essential to go with your loosely gripped racket. Your forearm has to rotate as you strike the shuttle so that you are looking at the inside of your arm as you reach up to strike the shuttle. As you hit the shuttle and follow through with the racket, you should see the top of your forearm. Your arm should swing down across your body at the end of your swing. The racket approaches the shuttle to hit it edgewise then the face of the racket (the strings) make contact with the shuttle. Forearm rotation will ensure you get a solid hit on the shuttle.

 

BODY POSITION

The third key to the correct technique for hitting a shuttle is to turn your body as you strike the shuttle so that your left (right if you are left-handed) shoulder is turned perpendicular to the net. As you hit the shuttle your body opens up to hit the shuttle and you follow through, bringing your racket arm across your body while your trunk turns towards the net then downward as your racket arm comes across your body.

 

READY POSITION

Lastly, if you are in the “ready” position, you can’t help but make good contact with the shuttle served to you, and you should be thinking about where you plan to hit that service. Thinking is the higher level skill that will take you to the next level of play once you have the basic shots, footwork, and stamina.

 

The “ready” position includes:

  • Weight balanced between your two feet–you are on the balls of your feet
  • Non-racket leg out in front of your body (if right-handed, your left foot should be out in front of your left side-reverse for left-handers) and your knees are slightly bent
  • Racket is held up so you are ready to strike the shuttle (just holding the racket up can intimidate some servers)
  • Eyes watching the shuttle (sometimes players have so much action with the racket that you are distracted by all that motion-forget the racket movements and keep your eyes on the shuttle!)

 

If you can concentrate on these four things, you are well on the way to improving your play!

 

USA SENIORS WIN MEDALS AT 2011 BWF WORLD SENIOR CHAMPIONSHIPS

Congratulations are in order for five U.S. Seniors who won medals for the first time ever at the 2011 BWF World Senior Championships. The 5th competition of its kind was held in Richmond, British Columbia, Canada, August 21-17. The USA team was comprised of 36 members. Medalists included Wei Jian Wilson (VA), 55 Women’s Singles Gold Medalist; Bob Cook/Andy Gouw (CA), 65 Men’s Doubles Gold Medalists; and Sue Dommeyer/Rose Lei (CA), 60 Women’s Doubles Bronze Medalists. Way to go, Seniors!

 

***************************************************************************
USA TAKES 6 MEDALS AT 2011 PAN AM GAMES IN MEXICO

Congratulations to the 2011 USA Pan Am Games Badminton Team on the 6 medals won at the competition in Guadalajara, Mexico, October 14-20. The team included Iris Wang, Rena Wang, Eva Lee, and Paula Lynn Obanana on the Women’s Team, and Howard Bach, Tony Gunawan, Sattawat Pongnairat, and Halim Haryanto Ho on the Men’s Team, all players coming from California. Coaches were Ignatius Rusli and Ben Lee, Team Leader was Mohan Suybramaniam.

 

Gold medals were won by Howard Bach/Tony Gunawan in the Men’s Doubles event. Silver medalists were Halim Haryanto Ho/Sattawat Pongnairat in Men’s Doubles; Rena Wang/Iris Wang in Women’s Doubles; and Ho/Eva Lee in Mixed Doubles. Bronze medals were won by Lee/Paula Lynn Obanana in Women’s Doubles, and Bach/Obanana in Mixed Doubles.

 

***************************************************************************

 

LEE/OBANANA WIN NORWEGIAN INTERNATIONAL EVENT

 

Kudos to Eva Lee and Paula Lynn Obanana of California on winning gold in the Women’s Doubles event at the Norwegian International Badminton Championships in Oslo, Norway, November 17-20, 2011. They defeated Lotte Jonathans/Paulien Van Dooremalen, the #1 seeds from the Netherlands, 17-21, 21-6, 21-13. Lee also made it to the quarterfinals of the Mixed Doubles event with Halim Haryanto Ho (CA). Lee, Obanana, and Ho are among USAB’s top athletes currently on a worldwide tour in the midst of the 2012 Olympic qualifying season ending April 30, 2012.

 

Lee is attempting to make her second US Olympic Team after qualifying in 2008 in Women’s Singles and Women’s Doubles with May Mangkalakiri who has since retired from active elite competition. Lee has since teamed up with Obanana in Women’s Doubles and Ho in Mixed Doubles in hopes of earning a return trip to the Olympic Games. Obanana and Ho both became US citizens in 2011, Obanana in May and Ho in September.

 

*****************************************************************

2012 USAB INTERNATIONAL TEAMS

Congratulations to the following players who qualified to represent the USA on the 2012 Thomas and Uber Cup Teams and on the 2012 Pan American Championships Team. The USAB Adult Trails were held at the Boston Badminton Club in early December, 2011.

 

2012 Thomas Cup Team

Howard Bach

Phillip Chew

Tony Gunawan

Nicholas Jinadasa

Sattawat Pongnairat

Howard Shu

 

2012 Uber Cup Team

Eva Lee

Paula Lynn Obanana

Jamie Subandhi

Iris Wang

Rena Wang

 

2012 Pan American Championships Team

Howard Bach

Kyle Emerick

Tony Gunawan

Sattawat Pongnairat

Eva Lee

Paula Lynn Obanana

Jamie Subandhi

Iris Wang

 

**************************************************************************

 

WHAT IS THE USBEF? 

 

The United States Badminton Education Foundation works in cooperation with the USAB (the governing body of United States Badminton) to promote the growth and support of Badminton throughout our country. The USBEF was incorporated in the State of Massachusetts in 1967 and its Board Members consist of Badminton Players who serve voluntarily to “put something back into Badminton”.

OUR MISSION STATEMENT — To establish and promote throughout the United States an educational program  devoted to the development of Badminton as a means of healthful and physical fitness, to promote the recognition in schools, colleges, YMCA and other institutions with physical education programs of the carry-over benefits of Badminton, to give coaching and instructions to players throughout the U.S. Badminton in clinics and exhibitions which are in furtherance of educational objectives.

 

Website address:

http://unitedstatesbadmintoneducationfoundation.org/

 

Facebook address:

http://www.facebook.com/pages/USBEF/138594542823290

Leave a comment